How ‘In Behalf Of’ Differs from ‘On Behalf Of’

www.RuthlessEditor.comI’ve wondered from time to time about the difference between in behalf of and on behalf of. This recent post from Daily Writing Tips on GrammarBook.com sheds light on the nuance of difference between them.

In Behalf of vs. on Behalf of
Sometimes in writing and speaking we arrive at a phrase that forms a fork in the road to expression. Ideally, we can distinguish one path from the other, even if by subtlety.

Other forks pose a greater challenge. Each way looks the same, and the sounds from both are familiar. We pick our path and hope for the best, making our choice a 50-50 gamble. Continue

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3 Tips to Solve the Who vs. Whom Dilemma

www.RuthlessEditor.comFewer and fewer people seem to recognize when to use who and when to use whom. Have who and whom become interchangeable? 

It depends on whom you ask.

There still are people who value grammatical correctness, and there still are those who will judge you for not knowing the difference between who and whom.

These three tips will help those who care but get confused:

Continue

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Chuck Berry’s Legacy: Enunciation?!

www.RuthlessEditor.comChuck Berry, considered one of the most influential performers in the history of music, died March 18 at age 90.

Some called Berry the father of rock ‘n’ roll, citing the impact he had on Bob Dylan, the Beatles, the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones and the Yardbirds, to name a few.

His passing was covered worldwide. In analyzing his style, his enunciation — yes, enunciation — has emerged as part of what set him apart and contributed to his success. Continue

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Expanded Use of ‘Concerning’ is Disconcerting

www.RuthlessEditor.comI hate to be considered an inflexible, grumpy grammarian.

That’s why I’m working on controlling my irritation with the expanding use of concerning to mean something that is worrisome or unsettling.

There is so much going on in our country and our world that people are worried about, we hear this is concerning, that is concerning … ad infinitum. Continue

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Mind Your Grammar (& Visuals) With New Staff Intros

www.RuthlessEditor.comIt’s good business to introduce new staff members, whether they work directly with customers and clients, or whether they make the business hum behind the scenes.

Don’t underestimate the importance of this first impression. Choose your words and images with care.

Here is an introduction that I consider memorable — but for the wrong reasons. Continue

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Verbal Tic ‘So’ Considered Annoying, Overused

www.RuthlessEditor.comSo, here’s how this blog came to be:

A blog subscriber asked if I had noticed how widely “so” is being used, especially to start a spoken sentence.

When I Googled “overuse of so,” this headline appeared on my screen:

So, let’s bid farewell to 2016’s most annoying and overused word

It was followed by a subhead:

So, we undertook this research and we discovered the following … Continue

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Pre-existing or Preexisting, Health Care or Healthcare: Which Is Right?

www.RuthlessEditor.comPre-existing (or is it preexisting?) conditions and health care (or is it healthcare?) have taken over headlines and are dominating conversations across the country.

What is the grammatically correct way to express these words in writing?

My foremost source, The Associated Press Stylebook, prefers pre-existing with a hyphen, explaining: Continue

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Graduation Grammar: Alumn, Cum Laude, Emeritus … And More

www.RuthlessEditor.comSpring brings graduations, along with confusion about use and misuse of related terms. Let’s clear up a few.

Do you say: “Seth graduated Harvard University last week.”

What about: “Becca will graduate Clemmons High School in May.”

Neither is correct. Why? Continue

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Filet Or Fillet? Choose Your Word Or Cut Of Meat

www.RuthlessEditor.comWhen a blog subscriber asked about the difference between filet and fillet, both of which she sees at supermarkets and on restaurant menus, I had to admit I didn’t know if there was one.

I’m no Martha Stewart or Rachel Ray. My friends know the kitchen is not my favorite room.

However, I have had a few classes in French. Here’s my attempt to bring clarification to the difference between filet and fillet, which is minimal. Continue

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