Tag Archives: grammar

Less vs. Fewer with Time, Distance, Money

www.RuthlessEditor.comI’ve written before about the difference between less and fewer:

Grammar Pet Peeves

Misused Words

Bad Grammar in Marketing

Making the right choice continues to be confusing — sometimes even for me!

In a recent editing project, I suggested a change in some copy related to end-of-life care decisions.

Here was the original wording: Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Punctuating With the Colon: Do’s and Don’ts

www.RuthlessEditor.comThe two little dots that make up the colon seem pretty simple, but their grammatical use isn’t exactly straightforward.

The colon comes in handy when you want to provide an example or explanation, to cite a quotation, or to introduce a list. A colon implies that what follows it is related to what precedes it.

One of the most-asked questions I get about grammar rules that relate to the colon is whether to capitalize the first word that follows it. Style guides differ, but The Associated Press Stylebook, my preferred source, suggests: Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Expanded Use of ‘Concerning’ is Disconcerting

www.RuthlessEditor.comI hate to be considered an inflexible, grumpy grammarian.

That’s why I’m working on controlling my irritation with the expanding use of concerning to mean something that is worrisome or unsettling.

There is so much going on in our country and our world that people are worried about, we hear this is concerning, that is concerning … ad infinitum. Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Mind Your Grammar (& Visuals) With New Staff Intros

www.RuthlessEditor.comIt’s good business to introduce new staff members, whether they work directly with customers and clients, or whether they make the business hum behind the scenes.

Don’t underestimate the importance of this first impression. Choose your words and images with care.

Here is an introduction that I consider memorable — but for the wrong reasons. Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Verbal Tic ‘So’ Considered Annoying, Overused

www.RuthlessEditor.comSo, here’s how this blog came to be:

A blog subscriber asked if I had noticed how widely “so” is being used, especially to start a spoken sentence.

When I Googled “overuse of so,” this headline appeared on my screen:

So, let’s bid farewell to 2016’s most annoying and overused word

It was followed by a subhead:

So, we undertook this research and we discovered the following … Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Pre-existing or Preexisting, Health Care or Healthcare: Which Is Right?

www.RuthlessEditor.comPre-existing (or is it preexisting?) conditions and health care (or is it healthcare?) have taken over headlines and are dominating conversations across the country.

What is the grammatically correct way to express these words in writing?

My foremost source, The Associated Press Stylebook, prefers pre-existing with a hyphen, explaining: Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Graduation Grammar: Alumn, Cum Laude, Emeritus … And More

www.RuthlessEditor.comSpring brings graduations, along with confusion about use and misuse of related terms. Let’s clear up a few.

Do you say: “Seth graduated Harvard University last week.”

What about: “Becca will graduate Clemmons High School in May.”

Neither is correct. Why? Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Filet Or Fillet? Choose Your Word Or Cut Of Meat

www.RuthlessEditor.comWhen a blog subscriber asked about the difference between filet and fillet, both of which she sees at supermarkets and on restaurant menus, I had to admit I didn’t know if there was one.

I’m no Martha Stewart or Rachel Ray. My friends know the kitchen is not my favorite room.

However, I have had a few classes in French. Here’s my attempt to bring clarification to the difference between filet and fillet, which is minimal. Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Ignore Noun/Pronoun Agreement For Gender Neutrality? Count Me Out!

www.RuthlessEditor.comThe Associated Press Stylebook, my first choice among style guides and grammar reference manuals, rocked the writing world when it announced it was giving the green light to using the plural pronoun “they” with a singular noun.

AP explains:

They, them, their … In stories about people who identify as neither male nor female or ask not to be referred to as he/she/him/her: Use the person’s name in place of a pronoun, or otherwise reword the sentence, whenever possible. If they/them/their use is essential, explain in the text that the person prefers a gender-neutral pronoun. Be sure that the phrasing does not imply more than one person …

Continue

Like it? Share it!
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail