Tag Archives: silly spellcheck

Apostrophe: Descriptive or Possessive?

If you are a golfer or a fan, you probably know that the Presidents Cup was played in New Jersey from Sept. 26–Oct. 1. The United States team handily won the coveted cup.

You might wonder why there is no apostrophe in the event’s title. Why isn’t it President’s Cup or Presidents’ Cup?

Here’s the reason:

Some words that might appear to be possessive are simply descriptive. Neither the Presidents Cup as an event nor the cup as an award denotes that any president possesses or owns it. Continue

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3 Quiz Questions for National Punctuation Day

man with coffee ponders punctuationSunday, Sept. 24, 2017, is National Punctuation Day.

How will you celebrate?

I’ve thought about spending the day as founder Jeff Rubin suggested:

Sleep late. Go out for coffee and a bagel. Read a newspaper and use a red pen to circle all the punctuation errors. Visit a grocery store and make a list of all the “grocer’s apostrophes” you see (apple’s anyone?).

But I’d rather devote my time and this space to something helpful and constructive for you, my valued readers. Continue

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Pre-existing or Preexisting, Health Care or Healthcare: Which Is Right?

www.RuthlessEditor.comPre-existing (or is it preexisting?) conditions and health care (or is it healthcare?) have taken over headlines and are dominating conversations across the country.

What is the grammatically correct way to express these words in writing?

My foremost source, The Associated Press Stylebook, prefers pre-existing with a hyphen, explaining: Continue

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Filet Or Fillet? Choose Your Word Or Cut Of Meat

www.RuthlessEditor.comWhen a blog subscriber asked about the difference between filet and fillet, both of which she sees at supermarkets and on restaurant menus, I had to admit I didn’t know if there was one.

I’m no Martha Stewart or Rachel Ray. My friends know the kitchen is not my favorite room.

However, I have had a few classes in French. Here’s my attempt to bring clarification to the difference between filet and fillet, which is minimal. Continue

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Happy National Grammar Day! (Yes, grammar still matters)

www.RuthlessEditor.comI’m a shameless grammar geek!

I love writing, rewriting, and rewriting a sentence or paragraph until it says exactly what I want it to say in the manner I want to say it — commas, em dashes, capital letters, italics and all.

It’s comforting to know that I’m not alone.

In celebration of March 4 National Grammar Day 2017, I offer this selection of thoughts by like-minded people who agree: Yes, grammar still matters.

 

“Your grammar is a reflection of your image. Good or bad, you have made an impression. And like all impressions, you are in total control.”
— Jeffrey Gitomer, American author and business trainer Continue

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Exclamation Points Convey Excitement, But Use Them With Care

exclamation_point_cautionWow!!! Have you noticed how often exclamation points are overused?!! It’s over the top!!!!

A reader weighed in on exclamation points in my recent blog on pet peeves:

“The exclamation point is overused to the point it has lost its intent in the communication I read.”

What is the intent of an exclamation point? Continue

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What Do You Say: Lie Or Lay?

lie-vs-lay-on-beachDo you lie down or lay down? Do you lie the book on the table or lay the book on the table?

Lie vs. lay is one of our most confusing word choices.

You might want to lie down when you finish reading this blog, but I’m going to lay it on you anyway. I’m counting on my examples to help you make the right choices. Continue

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Grammatical Errors Sabotage Writer’s Message, Credibility

Embarrassing_Grammar_MistakesWhen this headline written by a member of one of my LinkedIn groups hit my inbox, I did a double take:
Is you Networking, Notworking?

Although it’s catchy, I clicked on the link to see if the errors — you instead of your, no capital Y, and a comma where none is needed — were intentional as a means to attract attention or whether they truly were oversights.

When I read further, I decided they had to be oversights, as these faux pas were only the beginning. Continue

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