Tag Archives: there’s vs there are

Headline Lessons: Contractions, Redundancies, Verb Forms

HeadlinesToday is a holiday in the U.S. — The Fourth of July (Independence Day) — so many of you probably are not in your office or at your computer.

But my email list is not limited to U.S. residents, so I went to my latest collection of headlines to develop a post for those of you who are toiling through this American holiday.

Headlines and the grammar lessons they teach

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Misused Words: Did I Just Say That?!

man grimacing

I commented recently to a writer/editor friend that I have long considered there’s the most misused word in the English language. She gave me a puzzled look, as if to disagree but lacking evidence.

I could fill this page — or maybe a book! — with examples. Consider this sampling from weather forecasters to legislators, from financial specialists to everyday people. Continue

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Matt Lauer’s Repeated Grammar Faux Pas

Matt LauerI get most of my news online, but while flipping TV channels one morning over breakfast, I caught Matt Lauer of NBC’s TODAY show saying, “We’re back after this.”

I replied out loud to no one in particular: “No, Matt, you will be back after this. We’re back is what you say when you actually come back.”

Matt has been uttering this ungrammatical phrase for a long time — I suspect since his foray into the world of media in 1979. Continue

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There’s Is No Substitute for There Are

There is no substitute for There Are (image of cranky woman)Blogger Sharon Greenthal’s observations on marriage are featured on today’s Huffington Post, one of my most-read websites. Her headline — What I Know After 25 Years Of Marriage — caught my eye. I was drawn to the title because I so respect and admire people whose marriages last that long and beyond.

Following her wise observation that “… while we may have moments, hours, even entire days when we’re giddy with happiness, for most of us, being happy all the time just isn’t possible,” she notes in an italicized line that stands alone: Continue

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